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UWCSEA supports transformational education for refugee and displaced youth around the world through Amala
UWCSEA supports transformational education for young refugees around the world through Amala

"I can now see things in different ways, I have become more confident in myself and I am learning to become the change I want to see in the world.”
—Edel from Somalia, Amala High School Diploma student in Amman, Jordan

Education is undeniably a vital opportunity in life. All the more if you do not have—or lose—access to it. Globally, tens of millions of displaced and refugee youth are without access to essential secondary education, greatly limiting their options and outlook for the future. But one organisation is offering hope.

In the June 2018 edition of Dunia, we first introduced readers to a groundbreaking partnership between UWCSEA and Amala Education (formerly Sky School). The name Amala is inspired by the Arabic word for ‘hope’ and reflects both the hope and opportunity their educational programmes provide. Co-founded and co-directed by Mia Eskelund Pedersen (UWC Mahindra College ’07) and Polly Akhurst (UWC Atlantic College ’06), Amala is dedicated to providing high-quality secondary education tailored for refugee youth around the world. The story of Amala exemplifies the UWC mission in action.

Founded in 2017, the organisation has grown quickly thanks to their entrepreneurial spirit and collaboration with committed partners, including UWCSEA.

High School Diploma Programme launch

After three years of development, including 11 curriculum hackathons (an innovative method of rapid course development), the Amala High School Diploma Programme is now a reality. The diploma programme officially launched in June 2020 in Amman, Jordan and is the first international high school diploma designed specifically for refugee youth and host communities.

Following a successful start with 25 students from six different countries in Africa and the Middle East, Amala is now preparing for the second diploma programme cohort to commence their studies in January 2021 in Amman. Additionally, the programme will launch in Kakuma Camp, Kenya in February 2021 with a cohort of 50 students.

A flexible, accelerated learning programme  completed  over 15  months, the Amala High School Diploma eliminates many of the barriers to accessing education that students may have faced previously. In light of COVID-19, the curriculum was adapted to ensure that all learning can take place online if required until it is safe to have in-person class sessions. The modular programme  offers both breadth and depth in five key streams, each comprising two courses.

Amala High School Diploma Structure

In parallel to their studies in the five streams, students conduct a ‘Personal Interest Project’ to further develop and explore specific interests and passions. Students also receive support in preparing for life beyond the diploma programme, including guidance counselling to help them identify pathways for higher education, employment,  entrepreneurship,  or whatever their ambition is beyond their studies with Amala. The diploma programme has already attracted interest from higher education providers including University of the People, Arizona State University and African Leadership University.

The Amala High School Diploma Programme represents the dedication and collaboration of educators, NGO leaders, students, former refugees, and other aligned individuals coming together and collectively contributing their expertise over countless hours to developing the Amala High School Diploma. Among them are a number of UWCSEA educators, staff, students, parents and alumni committed to making secondary education a reality for young refugees – and the College’s connections  extend  beyond  the diploma programme as well.

Fugee School partnership

Closer to Singapore, Amala is partnering with the Fugee School, an organisation providing access to educational opportunities for refugees in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. This collaboration came about thanks to a connection through  alumna  Aayesha  Fazal  ’15 who has been working with Rohingya refugees in Malaysia for several years, and who also leads Amala’s ‘Living Peace and Wellbeing’ course. Commenting on working with Amala students, Aayesha said, “With every individual student I get to know, the future suddenly seems abundant  in  possibility.”

The connections between the College and Amala include parents as well. Inspired by what he read about Amala, UWCSEA parent Brendan Hannigan was able to secure funding through the corporate and social responsibility arm of Allen & Overy Singapore to support a joint project between Amala and Fugee School. This led to a 10-week pilot in October 2020 of Amala’s Social Entrepreneurship and Ethical Leadership course modules to refugee students from Pakistan and Somalia who are now in Kuala Lumpur. Additionally, Brendan supported Amala to apply for a larger grant from Allen & Overy that will enable them to run the High School Diploma Programme in Kakuma Camp, Kenya for the next three years, as well as pro bono support from the firm. Amala and Fugee School are now in early discussions about the potential of running the Amala High School Diploma programme in Malaysia.

“Amala’s work addresses an undeniable and pressing need – it is simply unacceptable that only 24% of young displaced persons have access to secondary education”, Brendan said, going on to note that “Allen & Overy was impressed by the innovative approach shown by this very young organisation in addressing such a longstanding and egregious neglect … We were also struck by the manner in which Amala developed the programme,  leveraging  connections with leading educators and tailoring a programme to address the specific needs  of  young  displaced  people.”

Partners in purpose

Connections  between  UWCSEA  and Amala continue to deepen. Of the 11 curriculum hackathons held since June 2018 to develop the diploma programme  curriculum  and  courses, seven were hosted at the College. In addition, three UWCSEA-affiliated colleagues currently serve on Amala’s Executive Team. Louie Barnett, Education Lead at Amala, is responsible for leading the development and delivery of their educational work, and continues to teach part-time in the East High  School.

As Amala’s Programme Coordinator, Jessica Rapp ’12 is responsible for coordinating programme delivery, developing new partnerships and coordinating the organisation’s communications. Jessica was drawn to Amala following her previous experience working with refugees and displaced people in Greece and Colombia  where  she  witnessed  the impact of education on refugee communities.

East University Advisor, Niki Dinsdale, serves as Amala’s voluntary Head of Pathways Advising, working with a team including UWCSEA UAC colleagues Shruti Tewari (Dover) and Patrick Desbarats (East) to help Amala students find their path after the diploma programme, whether to higher education, employment, entrepreneurship or in another direction that suits their needs and skills.

Additionally, Tomoko Miyakoshi ’20 and Philippa Baxter ‘20, two of the founding members of the student-led Amala Focus Group on East Campus, continue to volunteer with the organisation. Tomoko supports their communications efforts through writing student profiles and Philippa is co-leading a project with Sreeya Mukherjee ’15 to ensure the curriculum is culturally responsive and inclusive.

Back on campus, students in the Amala Focus Group continue to actively support the organisation – and in doing so, they are developing themselves as changemakers and leaders. Writing to prospective student group members earlier this year, Tomoko shared a compelling message:

“By  educating  ourselves,  raising awareness, and reflecting on our work, we are building our own capacities as changemakers. Being part of the student group gave me opportunities to learn to listen to others, think more critically about the way I lead, and get to know and work with students from different grades. The skills and mindsets members … develop aren’t just applicable to supporting Amala. And that’s important because making transformative education accessible to displaced youth is just one of the multitudinous causes worth supporting in today’s world. I truly believe that the changes I’ve seen in myself throughout my time in the student group will benefit me in whatever I choose to pursue.”

In December 2020, UWCSEA signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Amala which names the College as a Founding Partner and reaffirms our commitments  to one another. There is no doubt that through our shared values and goals, UWCSEA and Amala’s partnership will continue to grow and to inspire our communities to create a better world for all.

Visit https://amalaeducation.org to learn more.

Photo and graphic courtesy of Amala Education.

Read More about Hope and Opportunity: Amala's High School Diploma for Young Refugees Takes Flight
UWCSEA Anti-racism

Dear UWCSEA Community,

As communities all over the world react to the brutal death of George Floyd and mobilise for change, we are determined to work to dismantle any systemic racism and injustices within UWCSEA as we equip students to take action for a more just and equitable society. As leaders and educators, we understand our vital role in creating and promoting change, and that we have a responsibility to stand up against racism and social injustice in all forms.

To inform our actions, we always begin with self-examination, listening, research and dialogue. Colleagues are collaboratively building lists of resources (links below) that will help us to understand better what underpins systemic racism and issues that contribute to injustice.

Dialogues and discussions with each other and with students, to understand the issues and identify further actions we collectively need to take, are already underway. This action includes the classroom: the review of our curriculum initiated by the UWCSEA Strategy 2018–2023, which includes close examination of our courses and whether our broad programme includes perspectives beyond the traditional Western narrative, is ongoing and as urgent as ever.

I am having conversations with individuals in our community to hear their experience. The Values in Action initiative launched in 2019, which convened community dialogues to review our core values, will now focus closer attention on issues of race and racism. In the 2020/2021 school year, unconscious bias training for leaders will deepen our awareness of less visible forms of racism and bias. How we recruit, how we communicate, how we represent multiple perspectives – these are just some of the behaviours and practices that need to be reviewed, improved and then firmly embedded taking an anti-racist perspective.  Much of this work had begun with our Strategy, but we are motivated by a new urgency as we listen to current and former members of our community whose voices may have been under-represented in the past.

Calls to account and action from across our community are critical to informing our next steps. The results and recommendations from student-led and alumni-led surveys will help to inform our next steps and priorities. We will do everything we can to listen and to create a safe space for all community members as we work together to do more, and do better.

I want to thank the UWCSEA community for your passion and your commitment to creating a more just College and society. We are listening, we are learning and we are committed to action.

We will continue to update you on our work and progress; some initial resources and opportunities to share your experiences or ideas are below.

Carma Elliot
College President
 

Resources, support and feedback

UWC movement

UWC International letter on Black Lives Matter and antiracism

Anti-racism resources for learning

- A collection of anti-racist books, audio books, podcasts, and documentaries curated by our Teacher Librarians is available here
- A growing collection of articles, tools and resource materials for individuals, teachers and parents – where you can also add your recommendations – is available here

Support and safeguarding

Students and alumni – If you have experienced racism or discrimination at UWCSEA, please contact our Senior Safeguarding Lead, Lia Gould, at liauwc@uwcsea.edu.sg with whom you can safely share your experience.

Surveys

Students and alumni are encouraged to share your experiences and views by participating in the student-led and alumni-led surveys being circulated. The results and recommendations from students and alumni will be vital to the change process.

Feedback and ideas

If you have feedback or ideas to support the College's antiracism work, please write to the Office of the President at president@uwcsea.edu.sg.

Read More about UWCSEA commitment to antiracism
OED journey

Findings from the ongoing longitudinal investigation into UWCSEA’s Outdoor Education programme are demonstrating substantial and consistent changes in students’ skills and qualities. This update offers a glimpse into the elements of the UWCSEA learner profile that students report they are developing most, and points to how the College’s Outdoor Education curriculum in the Middle and High School provides the avenues for this growth.


About the OSU study

This comprehensive evaluation aims to understand the effectiveness of UWCSEA’s expedition programme, by attempting to answer some challenging and complex questions on the emotional, psychological and overall wellbeing impact of our Outdoor Education programme on our students. We hope it will give us further insight into what we have observed anecdotally and learned through experience: that outdoor education experiences have a positive, long term impact on students that stays with them and is transformational.
The researchers are experts in experiential education and social psychology. The benefit of a longitudinal study lies in the ability to analyse patterns that emerge over time. It gives us an in depth perspective on student learning and over the last few years has affirmed the role that resilience, commitment to care, and communication play during expeditions. Findings shared each year offer glimpses of emerging themes, and have already helped us to refine our programme. For example, the decision to redevelop the Grade 8 expedition into “one continuous journey” was affirmed by students insights and onsite programme evaluation work by the researchers. The research also provides insights into some of the interdependencies between elements of our learning programme. Data collection will continue for another two years.


Resilience

At the forefront of students’ experiences across all expeditions, resilience manifests in multiple ways: individually, socially, and physically. It is most often reported when facing challenges, especially new ones. Whether cognitive, emotional or physical, students most often comment on:

  • being optimistic and confident when faced with challenges, 
  • persevering in the face of those challenges, 
  • having courage in unfamiliar situations
  • a perceived ability to transfer some aspects of resilience to life outside of the expedition

The five-day Grade 7 kayaking trip around Pulau Sibu stands out. As one student reflected:


I am able to successfully meet new challenges in my life because after going to the Sibu trip I learned that if I get my mind to do something out of my comfort zone, I can do it and it [sic] absolutely worth it. I feel like I have also become more of a risk-taker because I would’ve never challenged myself to go rock hopping when the current of the ocean was strong.


The Sibu programme also encourages students to work together, and to take care of one another in challenging circumstances. This results in the simultaneous cultivation of resilience, collaboration and commitment to care. Interestingly, students perceived that these traits were much better experienced on the outdoor education trip than in a school setting. This speaks to the value of allowing students to experience and further develop profile traits outside the normal school environment:


This trip made me more caring about others and how to make the world a better place … I managed to [be] social with various people on the trip making me aware of people’s problems and understanding them as we have more interaction on trips than class. This also gave me a chance to be in the other person’s shoes for a while

Commitment to Care

Caring for the natural world is a key characteristic that the expeditions seek to develop. This is particularly prevalent in students’ reported experiences on the Grade 6 expedition to Pulau Tioman, which has a great deal of time spent in nature undertaking different, but relatively short duration activities on their five-day itinerary. This time outside, whether on land or in and on the water, is very meaningful to students. An appreciation for nature, if not explicitly an aim of the Tioman trip, is certainly something students experience. Many students commented on the impact that the Juara Turtle Project had on them.


We were in a rainforest and on the water for most of the time, I felt like “Wow, this is the world we live in and it isn’t just the city that we see every day … I felt passionate about the environment and that I want to become more involved in helping the environment … when we visited the turtle centre, I found myself really concerned about the environment and even felt like crying after watching a video of the plastics that a turtle ate, which is something that I could never imagine myself to do if I have not gone on this trip, as I felt myself as part of this natural world.


And another student:


I am committed to helping the environment and animals. Whilst on the Tioman trip we learned a lot about turtles and I felt a deep connection to them. Weirdly enough, on the same day, my mother found a turtle crossing the street that was abandoned with scars on its nostrils which led to deformity. Ever since we have been taking care of him and love him so much. I feel that it is my duty to help animals any way I can, and the environment.


Some students expressed a desire to take what was learned beyond Tioman while mentioning how very meaningful the trip was to them.

I felt more passionate about shaping a better world during all the learning we did on sea turtles and all the consequences they have to face due to the increase in human development. I guess I have more of the urge to spread awareness around to others so that they can take action and responsibility in helping to save the turtles.

Communication, Collaboration, and Self-Management

A full 11 days, the Grade 8 trip is a significantly longer expedition, and offers students the opportunity to interact with peers from both campuses, as well as in unique cultural environments. These enhanced challenges especially encourage resilience, communication, collaboration, and self-management. In a reflection that is representative of many from the same year group, one student’s comment illustrates a progression in collaboration and communication outside the classroom environment:


I have been able to work with many people throughout this trip. I have seen this because we always had to be in groups for different things such as the cooking or the rafting. Especially during adventure week. This has really pushed me to collaborate with different people I don’t usually talk to and it has also helped me to learn a little bit more about the people in my class. I have been able to communicate with everyone and work effectively. At the beginning, it was a little bit hard, but as we had to put this skill into more practice, it became easier and it was also really fun.


In a common theme across grades, another student described the significance of learning outside the classroom:


Not only have I bonded with my mentor class as a whole, but there are a few people in my class who I’ve been more involved with, expanding my usual group of friends. Most of my close friends are not even in my class this year. But all it needed was time, and a different environment, other than school. Doing activities where we were supporting each other was crucial. At the end it brought us all together, and people noticed the good in me as well, which made me want to carry on that relationship more strongly, feeling trustworthy and balanced all at once.

The conditions of the expedition that pushed students to communicate and collaborate also encouraged self-management. Appropriate to students’ development, the Grade 8 trip affords the opportunity to cultivate this trait:

I think being in Chiang Mai taught me a lot about having to be independent, especially in adventure week. We had to cook our own food every day, and set up our bivvies pretty much on our own, otherwise we wouldn’t have food to eat or a place to sleep. Also when we were out during the day we had to use our own initiative to help each other and work together.

Read More about Inspiration from the outside
UWCSEA supports transformational education for refugee and displaced youth around the world through Amala
UWCSEA supports transformational education for young refugees around the world through Amala

"I can now see things in different ways, I have become more confident in myself and I am learning to become the change I want to see in the world.”
—Edel from Somalia, Amala High School Diploma student in Amman, Jordan

Education is undeniably a vital opportunity in life. All the more if you do not have—or lose—access to it. Globally, tens of millions of displaced and refugee youth are without access to essential secondary education, greatly limiting their options and outlook for the future. But one organisation is offering hope.

In the June 2018 edition of Dunia, we first introduced readers to a groundbreaking partnership between UWCSEA and Amala Education (formerly Sky School). The name Amala is inspired by the Arabic word for ‘hope’ and reflects both the hope and opportunity their educational programmes provide. Co-founded and co-directed by Mia Eskelund Pedersen (UWC Mahindra College ’07) and Polly Akhurst (UWC Atlantic College ’06), Amala is dedicated to providing high-quality secondary education tailored for refugee youth around the world. The story of Amala exemplifies the UWC mission in action.

Founded in 2017, the organisation has grown quickly thanks to their entrepreneurial spirit and collaboration with committed partners, including UWCSEA.

High School Diploma Programme launch

After three years of development, including 11 curriculum hackathons (an innovative method of rapid course development), the Amala High School Diploma Programme is now a reality. The diploma programme officially launched in June 2020 in Amman, Jordan and is the first international high school diploma designed specifically for refugee youth and host communities.

Following a successful start with 25 students from six different countries in Africa and the Middle East, Amala is now preparing for the second diploma programme cohort to commence their studies in January 2021 in Amman. Additionally, the programme will launch in Kakuma Camp, Kenya in February 2021 with a cohort of 50 students.

A flexible, accelerated learning programme  completed  over 15  months, the Amala High School Diploma eliminates many of the barriers to accessing education that students may have faced previously. In light of COVID-19, the curriculum was adapted to ensure that all learning can take place online if required until it is safe to have in-person class sessions. The modular programme  offers both breadth and depth in five key streams, each comprising two courses.

Amala High School Diploma Structure

In parallel to their studies in the five streams, students conduct a ‘Personal Interest Project’ to further develop and explore specific interests and passions. Students also receive support in preparing for life beyond the diploma programme, including guidance counselling to help them identify pathways for higher education, employment,  entrepreneurship,  or whatever their ambition is beyond their studies with Amala. The diploma programme has already attracted interest from higher education providers including University of the People, Arizona State University and African Leadership University.

The Amala High School Diploma Programme represents the dedication and collaboration of educators, NGO leaders, students, former refugees, and other aligned individuals coming together and collectively contributing their expertise over countless hours to developing the Amala High School Diploma. Among them are a number of UWCSEA educators, staff, students, parents and alumni committed to making secondary education a reality for young refugees – and the College’s connections  extend  beyond  the diploma programme as well.

Fugee School partnership

Closer to Singapore, Amala is partnering with the Fugee School, an organisation providing access to educational opportunities for refugees in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. This collaboration came about thanks to a connection through  alumna  Aayesha  Fazal  ’15 who has been working with Rohingya refugees in Malaysia for several years, and who also leads Amala’s ‘Living Peace and Wellbeing’ course. Commenting on working with Amala students, Aayesha said, “With every individual student I get to know, the future suddenly seems abundant  in  possibility.”

The connections between the College and Amala include parents as well. Inspired by what he read about Amala, UWCSEA parent Brendan Hannigan was able to secure funding through the corporate and social responsibility arm of Allen & Overy Singapore to support a joint project between Amala and Fugee School. This led to a 10-week pilot in October 2020 of Amala’s Social Entrepreneurship and Ethical Leadership course modules to refugee students from Pakistan and Somalia who are now in Kuala Lumpur. Additionally, Brendan supported Amala to apply for a larger grant from Allen & Overy that will enable them to run the High School Diploma Programme in Kakuma Camp, Kenya for the next three years, as well as pro bono support from the firm. Amala and Fugee School are now in early discussions about the potential of running the Amala High School Diploma programme in Malaysia.

“Amala’s work addresses an undeniable and pressing need – it is simply unacceptable that only 24% of young displaced persons have access to secondary education”, Brendan said, going on to note that “Allen & Overy was impressed by the innovative approach shown by this very young organisation in addressing such a longstanding and egregious neglect … We were also struck by the manner in which Amala developed the programme,  leveraging  connections with leading educators and tailoring a programme to address the specific needs  of  young  displaced  people.”

Partners in purpose

Connections  between  UWCSEA  and Amala continue to deepen. Of the 11 curriculum hackathons held since June 2018 to develop the diploma programme  curriculum  and  courses, seven were hosted at the College. In addition, three UWCSEA-affiliated colleagues currently serve on Amala’s Executive Team. Louie Barnett, Education Lead at Amala, is responsible for leading the development and delivery of their educational work, and continues to teach part-time in the East High  School.

As Amala’s Programme Coordinator, Jessica Rapp ’12 is responsible for coordinating programme delivery, developing new partnerships and coordinating the organisation’s communications. Jessica was drawn to Amala following her previous experience working with refugees and displaced people in Greece and Colombia  where  she  witnessed  the impact of education on refugee communities.

East University Advisor, Niki Dinsdale, serves as Amala’s voluntary Head of Pathways Advising, working with a team including UWCSEA UAC colleagues Shruti Tewari (Dover) and Patrick Desbarats (East) to help Amala students find their path after the diploma programme, whether to higher education, employment, entrepreneurship or in another direction that suits their needs and skills.

Additionally, Tomoko Miyakoshi ’20 and Philippa Baxter ‘20, two of the founding members of the student-led Amala Focus Group on East Campus, continue to volunteer with the organisation. Tomoko supports their communications efforts through writing student profiles and Philippa is co-leading a project with Sreeya Mukherjee ’15 to ensure the curriculum is culturally responsive and inclusive.

Back on campus, students in the Amala Focus Group continue to actively support the organisation – and in doing so, they are developing themselves as changemakers and leaders. Writing to prospective student group members earlier this year, Tomoko shared a compelling message:

“By  educating  ourselves,  raising awareness, and reflecting on our work, we are building our own capacities as changemakers. Being part of the student group gave me opportunities to learn to listen to others, think more critically about the way I lead, and get to know and work with students from different grades. The skills and mindsets members … develop aren’t just applicable to supporting Amala. And that’s important because making transformative education accessible to displaced youth is just one of the multitudinous causes worth supporting in today’s world. I truly believe that the changes I’ve seen in myself throughout my time in the student group will benefit me in whatever I choose to pursue.”

In December 2020, UWCSEA signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Amala which names the College as a Founding Partner and reaffirms our commitments  to one another. There is no doubt that through our shared values and goals, UWCSEA and Amala’s partnership will continue to grow and to inspire our communities to create a better world for all.

Visit https://amalaeducation.org to learn more.

Photo and graphic courtesy of Amala Education.

Read More about Hope and Opportunity: Amala's High School Diploma for Young Refugees Takes Flight
UWCSEA Anti-racism

Dear UWCSEA Community,

As communities all over the world react to the brutal death of George Floyd and mobilise for change, we are determined to work to dismantle any systemic racism and injustices within UWCSEA as we equip students to take action for a more just and equitable society. As leaders and educators, we understand our vital role in creating and promoting change, and that we have a responsibility to stand up against racism and social injustice in all forms.

To inform our actions, we always begin with self-examination, listening, research and dialogue. Colleagues are collaboratively building lists of resources (links below) that will help us to understand better what underpins systemic racism and issues that contribute to injustice.

Dialogues and discussions with each other and with students, to understand the issues and identify further actions we collectively need to take, are already underway. This action includes the classroom: the review of our curriculum initiated by the UWCSEA Strategy 2018–2023, which includes close examination of our courses and whether our broad programme includes perspectives beyond the traditional Western narrative, is ongoing and as urgent as ever.

I am having conversations with individuals in our community to hear their experience. The Values in Action initiative launched in 2019, which convened community dialogues to review our core values, will now focus closer attention on issues of race and racism. In the 2020/2021 school year, unconscious bias training for leaders will deepen our awareness of less visible forms of racism and bias. How we recruit, how we communicate, how we represent multiple perspectives – these are just some of the behaviours and practices that need to be reviewed, improved and then firmly embedded taking an anti-racist perspective.  Much of this work had begun with our Strategy, but we are motivated by a new urgency as we listen to current and former members of our community whose voices may have been under-represented in the past.

Calls to account and action from across our community are critical to informing our next steps. The results and recommendations from student-led and alumni-led surveys will help to inform our next steps and priorities. We will do everything we can to listen and to create a safe space for all community members as we work together to do more, and do better.

I want to thank the UWCSEA community for your passion and your commitment to creating a more just College and society. We are listening, we are learning and we are committed to action.

We will continue to update you on our work and progress; some initial resources and opportunities to share your experiences or ideas are below.

Carma Elliot
College President
 

Resources, support and feedback

UWC movement

UWC International letter on Black Lives Matter and antiracism

Anti-racism resources for learning

- A collection of anti-racist books, audio books, podcasts, and documentaries curated by our Teacher Librarians is available here
- A growing collection of articles, tools and resource materials for individuals, teachers and parents – where you can also add your recommendations – is available here

Support and safeguarding

Students and alumni – If you have experienced racism or discrimination at UWCSEA, please contact our Senior Safeguarding Lead, Lia Gould, at liauwc@uwcsea.edu.sg with whom you can safely share your experience.

Surveys

Students and alumni are encouraged to share your experiences and views by participating in the student-led and alumni-led surveys being circulated. The results and recommendations from students and alumni will be vital to the change process.

Feedback and ideas

If you have feedback or ideas to support the College's antiracism work, please write to the Office of the President at president@uwcsea.edu.sg.

Read More about UWCSEA commitment to antiracism

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